Our fellow Nicole Batsch shares her experience....

Our fellow Nicole Batsch shares her experience....

While I was writing my PhD I craved the opportunity to discuss and debate the state of the dementia field, where it’s been and where it’s going and the often competing priorities of stakeholders including people living with dementia, families, health care professionals, researchers, policy makers and the charity sector. What I learned was that a PhD was often a long, lonely slog with only the warm glow from my computer screen to keep me company.

But for the past nine months, I’ve finally had that opportunity to discuss and debate and I’ve gotten to experience it in a multi-disciplinary setting to better understand the perspectives of other disciplines different to my own.

A Laughing Matter: SF Comedian Looks to Tell the Stories of Dementia Patients, Caregivers

A Laughing Matter: SF Comedian Looks to Tell the Stories of Dementia Patients, Caregivers

Failing a calculus class and grappling with tax issues made comedian Josh Kornbluth very unhappy, so he created and performed comedic monologues about the topics to feel more in control of his life.

Now he is tapping into that type of storytelling for dementia patients and their caregivers at UC San Francisco.

Kornbluth is one of 32 inaugural Atlantic Fellows at the Global Brain Health Institute, a collaboration between the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF and Trinity College, in Dublin, Ireland.

Brain Lessons: Creativity, Courage, and Cooking

In early June, the Global Brain Health Institute hosted Suzana Herculano-Houzel, a Brazilian scientist who challenged the dogma that the brain has a hundred billion neurons. Herculano-Houzel could find no evidence or origin for this claim, so she set out to count every neuron herself. Her book The Human Advantage chronicles her journey into the brain to prove that humans fall short of this number. In the end, she found that the human brain has 86 billion neurons, far fewer than other species with bigger brains. Her message: humans aren’t as special as we think we are.

Mediterranean Style Diet May Prevent Dementia

Mediterranean Style Diet May Prevent Dementia

Good news from research by GBHI Fellow Claire McEvoy: following the Mediterranean diet is linked to a 30-35% decrease in risk of cognitive impairment in older adults.

McEvoy presented the findings at the Alzheimer's Association annual meeting in London this week, which earned her the conference's Postdoc Poster Award. Her research was covered in CNN, CBS, the Guardian, Fortune, and Daily Mail.