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Nicole Rogers, PhD

Atlantic Fellow at GBHI
UCsf Memory and aging center

nicole.rogers@gbhi.org
Professional Profile
Home Country: Chile
Profession: Neurologist
Social Media: Twitter: @nrogersc; Instagram: @nikirogersc

Nicole Rogers has been working in describing the rates of sedentarism in Chilean older population, as well as the impact of physical activity both as a preventive and disease-modifying treatment for mild cognitive impairment.

In prevention, I see a gateway to understanding how different etiologies interact in the development of cognitive impairment, and why some people develop the disease and others not.

The efforts in protecting the aging population's brain health must first put a focus in recognizing its magnitude. Rogers believes that insufficient worldwide attention has been put in the prevention of dementia, and that this has led to a stall in terms of therapy and cure. Further basic and epidemiological research, as well as an improvement in how we broadcast new discoveries to the community, may reduce the breach in the areas of education and prevention that exist in some countries, including Chile. Rogers is interested in cheap non-pharmacological interventions that may be easily integrated in current health programs for older adults.

During the last year, Rogers has been collecting data on physical activity habits from a cohort of older adult patients with and without memory impairment through the use of activity wrist trackers. When not following patients walking routines around Santiago, Rogers can be found dancing, visiting foreign food markets, binge watching TV series, and reading novels.

Bio: Nicole Rogers received her medical school training from Universidad de los Andes, and her specialty in Adult Neurology from the University of Chile. She went on to complete a PhD in Medical Sciences also from the University of Chile. During the last two years, she has been dedicated to the areas of neurointensive care and clinical research in mild cognitive impairment patients.

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