The feasibility of a peer support intervention to encourage adoption and maintenance of a Mediterranean diet in established community groups at increased CVD risk: the TEAM-MED EXTEND study: a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial

The British journal of nutrition

Br J Nutr. 2021 Oct 7:1-14. doi: 10.1017/S0007114521004050. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a peer support intervention to encourage adoption and maintenance of a Mediterranean diet (MD) in established community groups where existing social support may assist the behaviour change process. Four established community groups with members at increased Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk and homogenous in gender were recruited and randomised to receive either a 12-month Peer Support (PS) intervention (PSG) (n 2) or a Minimal Support intervention (educational materials only) (MSG) (n 2). The feasibility of the intervention was assessed using recruitment and retention rates, assessing the variability of outcome measures (primary outcome: adoption of an MD at 6 months (using a Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS)) and process evaluation measures including qualitative interviews. Recruitment rates for community groups (n 4/8), participants (n 31/51) and peer supporters (n 6/14) were 50 %, 61 % and 43 %, respectively. The recruitment strategy faced several challenges with recruitment and retention of participants, leading to a smaller sample than intended. At 12 months, a 65 % and 76·5 % retention rate for PSG and MSG participants was observed, respectively. A > 2-point increase in MDS was observed in both the PSG and the MSG at 6 months, maintained at 12 months. An increase in MD adherence was evident in both groups during follow-up; however, the challenges faced in recruitment and retention suggest a definitive study of the peer support intervention using current methods is not feasible and refinement based on the current feasibility study should be incorporated. Lessons learned during the implementation of this intervention will help inform future interventions in this area.

PMID:34753522 | DOI:10.1017/S0007114521004050

Authors

Roisin F O'Neill
Laura McGowan
Claire T McEvoy
Sara Megan Wallace
Sarah E Moore
Michelle C McKinley
Frank Kee
Margaret E Cupples
Ian S Young
Jayne V Woodside