Lea Tenenholz Grinberg, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Neurology and Pathology

Dementia is a worldwide epidemic. Only by fully engaging all the sectors of society will we be able to fight it.

Current Work

John Douglas French Alzheimer’s Foundation Endowed Professor Department of Neurology and Pathology Faculty at GBHI/UCSF

Personal Hero

I learn something from everyone.

Words of Strength

Creativity, grit, optimism, drive, curiosity

Vision

Dementia is a worldwide epidemic. Only by fully engaging all the sectors of society will we be able to fight it. We need to be inclusive and give everybody the opportunity to lower their risk by providing education, good nutrition and elimination of modifiable risk factors

Strategy

Lea is a neuropathologist with a broad interest in all aspects of dementia. In her work, she investigates the initial brain damage caused by neurodegenerative diseases. Lea beieves that by doing so we will be able to cut the problem at its roots.

Motivation

Dementia varies in different populations. In Lea's work, they look at how biological (ethnicity, genes, gender) and societal factors (educational attainment, cardiovascular risk factors) impact dementia.

Education & Experience

Lea trained in neuropathology and neuroanatomy. Currently, she is the John Douglas French Alzheimer’s Foundation Endowed Professor and an Associate Professor of Neurology and Pathology at the University of California, San Francisco. She also holds a tenured faculty position (WOS) at the University of Sao Paulo. In 2009, she was the recipient of the L’Oréal-UNESCO Award “For Women in Science”. Her research focuses on neurodegenerative diseases with special emphasis on early disease stages, selective vulnerability and pathological heterogeneity. Her contributions to the field of dementia include: identifying brainstem nuclei as the earliest structures affected in Alzheimer's disease and translating these findings to diagnostic and treatment development, investigating the neurobiological basis of sleep dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases; developing and implementing high-resolution histology tools to validate multimodal neuroimaging findings. She directs the Human Validation Core for the National Institutes of Health-funded U54 Center Without Walls for Tau Biology, co-directs the Neurodegenerative disease brain bank at UCSF, is a Co-PI for the U54 LEADS Neuropathology Core and is a Principal Investigator of the Tau Consortium. She is a member of the Governing Board of the Brazilian Biobank for Aging Studies and of the Executive Board of the Global Brain Health Institute. She is also the chairperson for the selection committee of the Global Brain Health Institute; UCSF Academic Senate’s Committee on Research and Neuromodularoty Subcortical System; and PIA of the ISTAART.