Salvo Spina, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

It is in the fascinating microscopic world of neuropathology that we must look to unveil the cure of neurodegenerative dementias.

Current Work

Salvo is a behavioral neurologist with extensive experience in the neuropathology of neurodegenerative dementia. The central focus of his research is the study of the neuropathological substrates underlying the heterogeneous phenotypic expression of dementia. Salvo’s research aims to ascertain the neuropathological correlates of in vivo biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

Personal Hero

My parents

Words of Strength

Committed to providing utmost care

Vision

It is in the microscopic world of neuropathology, the intricate networks of neurons and their connections, that the secrets of neurodegenerative dementias ultimately reside. It is in this fascinating world, that we must look to unveil the cure of these diseases.

Strategy

Salvo’s research methodology integrates behavioral neurology, neuroimaging, as well as classic and advanced neuropathology to assess dozens of protein and nucleic acid markers in the same histological sections. His research focuses on the development of deep learning algorithms for biomarkers quantifications.

Motivation

At GBHI, Salvo teaches the writing skills curriculum and is the organizer of the case study section of the Global Neurology Forum, a quarterly, video-conference stage aimed at promoting a world-wide discussion on the impact of social determinants of care on brain health and disease.

Education & Experience

Salvo received his medical degree from the University of Catania, Italy. He completed a neurology residency at the University of Siena, Italy, from which he also obtained his doctorate degree on mechanisms of neurodegeneration. He was trained in dementia neuropathology at the Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indianapolis, in the laboratory of Dr. Bernardino Ghetti. Later, he completed a neurology residency at Indiana University, and a behavioral neurology fellowship at the Memory and Aging Center, UCSF, where he is now an Assistant Professor of Neurology.